Rwenzori Mountains

24, October 2011

 Mount Rwenzori is a mountain range in Uganda located on the border between Uganda and the Democratic Republic of the Congo also known as “Mountains of the moon”. With a summit height at 5,109 meters ((16,761 ft), Mount Rwenzori is the second highest mountain in East Africa. The mountain range is well known worldwide for its tremendous hiking experience, scenery, sunsets, permanent snow capes, views of the clouds from above and biological species biodiversity. Over 70 mammals including 4 species of diurnal primate, 15 species of butterfly and 217 bird species including 19 Albertine Rift endemics, as well as some of the world’s rarest vegetation have been identified at Mount Rwenzori and its surrounding.

As you take the Rwenzori hike, the history and mythology of the area will fill your mind. A mountain range that covers 996km2 formed after a massive uplift in the earth’s crust. The range stretching some 120 km north/south and 48 km east/west with 6 snows capped mountains-Margherita Peak as the highest. It is believed the formation was about three million years ago in the late Pliocene, as a result of an uplifted block of crystalline rocks including: gneiss, amphibolites granite, and quartzite.

The first sightings of Rwenzori was by  the expedition of European explorer Henry Morton Stanley in 1889 and  William Grant Stairs who climbed to 3,254 meters (10,676 ft) though the  first ascent to the summit was made by the Duke of the Abruzzi in 1906. There are 2 primary routes that can be taken to the summit – The Central Circuit Trail from the trailhead at Mihunga, the route ascends the Bujuku Valley via Nyabitaba for acclimatization before reaching the peaks- which is an easier climb and the one most frequently used and the Kilembe Trail that ascends the southern slopes of the Rwenzori from a trailhead at Kilembe near the town of Kasese.

Rwenzori mountain ranges lie within Rwenzori mountains National Park gazetted in 1991-a UNESCO World Heritage Site, and is one of the few places on earth that encompasses every ecological life zone including; Savanna about 3,000 and 5,500 feet (914 - 1,676 m.), the Rainforest above the Grasslands from 5,500 to 7,500 feet (1,676 - 2,286 m.) with giant ferns, wild banana trees and lianas, Bamboo reaching up to around 9,500 feet (2,895 m.), Heath zone above the bamboo that extends up to around 12,000 feet (3,657 m.), the Alpine zone, above 12,000 feet (3,657 m.) with the tree groundsel and giant lobelia and above 14,500 feet is wrapped in permanent snow and storm-swept glaciers.

 The region's waterfalls, lakes and glaciers make it one of Africa's most beautiful alpine areas. A popular tourist destination for mountain climbers- a real hiker’s heaven in Africa and photographers thanks to its otherworldly shape! Hikers get to admire the wonderful landscapes that add up to the explorations. The main peak of the mountain can be climbed easily by a person with basic mountaineering skills, although altitude and unpredictable weather make for a challenging and adventurous trip. It is perfect for people who wish to gain snow experience.

People from around the world are captivated by Rwenzori Mountain height - some 5,109 meters above sea level - and the adventurous, driven, mountain climbers who take it on embody the physical and mental extremes that test human capabilities.

The ancient Precambrian rocks which were extruded from the surrounding plains during the formation of the western rift valley is another worldly wonder in the magnificent homelands of the Bakonjo and Baamba-Bantu speaking people who have lived on the mountain for many generations, and whose culture is adapted to the steep slopes and climate of Rwenzori.

If you’re among the people in this world who actually seek out extreme thrills, then climbing Mount Rwenzori has to be high on your list – if not at the top. There is, of course, the danger associated with navigating the East Africa’s second tallest mountain, and doing quite a bit of it with very little oxygen.

Doing that kind of activity will undoubtedly lead to the kind of bragging rights you can use at any point in your life to one-up just about anyone you encounter. That is unless they’ve also climbed Rwenzori, and then you’d have to go to No. 2 on your list, so just be prepared. But if you’d rather listen to a couple of climbers who have been to Rwenzori – and even done a little climbing there – then you’re in luck.

What to Do and See in Rwenzori Mountains

Apart from usual known adventure Rwenzori climbing, there are a lot more to see in Mount Rwenzori. Travelers can do a trip for wildlife nature walks conducted in the park, high altitude flora described as Africa's botanic Big Game, natural waterfalls to see like Ngitte, Rwajimba and Semuliki, birds, monkeys, Hot springs, numerous caves and lakes- Rwenzori Mountains are worthy a place to visit as it is one of the few unspoilt Mountains of the world because of its rugged nature yet this wilderness character is an attraction for many climbers and Mountaineers.

What to Wear and Bring

For Rwenzori Mountains light day hike, you won't have to procure any unique gear or frightening equipment. But a few minutes of preparation means you'll go home with a smile on your face instead of blisters on your feet!

Wear layered outfits for Rwenzori mountaineering excitement; it may seem chilly now, but once you begin hiking, you'll warm up quickly. Hiking boots are great, but for a light hike a sneaker with a heavy tread will be just fine. Wear a hat; it will shade your face from the sun, protecting you from sunburn and making it easier to see.

Have water during Rwenzori hike; studies prove that by drinking water, you increase your stamina for physical activities. Put the water in a small backpack along with a couple of granola bars, a bagel or a bag of trail mix for a quick burst of energy. If it's an all-day hike, pack a sandwich for lunch. Pack sun block; you don't want sunburn as your souvenir!

 

 

 

 

The Mountain Gorilla

24, October 2011

About half the world's population of gorillas lives in Bwindi Impenatrable forest and Mgahinga Gorilla Park in Uganda. The mountain gorillas are must see for anyone visiting Uganda. A 3 day gorilla safari in Uganda is enough for one to have a life changig experience with this rare species of gorillas. Many people from all over the world take africa adventure safaris with the hope of visiting Uganda, the Pearl of Africa. Don't miss out.

Our Culture

25, October 2011

Uganda’s culture

Uganda’s is well blessed with people originating from the five main distinctive groups, four of which were immigrants while one was an original inhabitant of the land. The country’s most ancient inhabitants confined to the hilly southwest are the Batwa and Bambuti Pygmies, remnants of the hunter-gatherer cultures that once occupied much of East Africa.

Considered as “Summarized Africa”, Uganda is a hub for the African cultures because almost every African society is well represented. Describing this country’s culture is not an easy task as the diversity of its people is over whelming. Let us know where to begin from and I may try to lead you to its end. Positioned at the geographical heart of the African continent, Uganda has long been a cultural melting pot, as evidenced by the existence of over 66 different indigenous cultures and dialects belonging to five distinct linguistic groups with an equally diverse cultural medley of music, art and handicrafts.

Bantu speaking people are among the four major immigrant groups and they include Bakonjo, Basamia, Banyoro, Baganda, Bamasaba, Basoga, Bagwere, Batooro, Banyankole, Bakiga, to mention but a few. They are said to have originated from Cameroon highlands and Congo forests. They include these tribes settled in the southern part of the country separated from the Nilotic tribes of the North by the swampy L. Kyoga. These were mainly cultivators and reared few animals.

Originated around the Ethiopian highlands, some Hamites and Nilo-Hamites settled in the south western Uganda, Rwanda, others in the northeast and eastern parts of Uganda. The Hamites tribe was made of the Hutu and Tutsi in Rwanda and Hima who are currently living in Ankole and have been absorbed into Banyankole. The Nilo-Hamites include the Iteso, Karimajong and Kumam in the eastern and north eastern part of the country. They were largely pastoralists, herding several numbers of animals with which they would move from one place to another looking for pasture and water.

Composed of the Lugbara, Madi, Acholi, Langi, Kakwa and Alur among others, the Nilotic group are said to have come from Sudan and later settled in the west Nile and other northern parts of Uganda.

Happenings and incidents are celebrated by almost all Uganda’s cultures and sub tribes in the same though in different ways. For example most societies considered the birth of twins as a blessing and leading to community jubilation. The birth of a prince, victory in war, inauguration of a king and in some societies, the initiation of a member from one stage to another as well as performing of rituals are some other occasions that would attract great celebrations in Ugandan societies.

Baganda dominates the central part of the country and they are famous for their different ceremonial occasions prepared for fulfillment of cultural rituals and norms, commemoration, remembrance, observance and inauguration. Some of the common ceremonies in Buganda include; the initiation of twins (okwalula abalongo), the introduction (okwanjula) and last funeral rite (okwabya olumbe). Other ceremonies like cerebration of the king’s birth day are also significant in the life of a Muganda.

Traditional Cultural dances are paramount in bringing a spirit of togetherness, entertaining the king and a symbol of identity to the Baganda culture that include Bakisimba, Amagunju, Muwogola and Nankasa. Sight several key cultural sites in Buganda including a UNESCO world heritage site-Kasubi tombs where bodies of the former kings were laid to rest, Wamala tombs another burial site for some kings and Nakayima tree eminent residence for the goddess Nakayima believed to be a source of blessings. The Baganda dance involve a flawless `circular’ movement of the waist and a tip toeing movement of the feet plus hands spread out from the shoulder joint but bent forward or up wards at the elbow joint depending on the type of dance. The dance moves or patterns are dictated by the lyrics or song meaning but mostly by the cadence of the song.

Western side of Uganda is dominated by the Banyankole who are well recognized for their wealthy culture connected with their strong link and love for their long horned cows which are thought to have originated from the former rulers of Bunyoro Kitara Empire called the Bachwezi-a demi god people who introduced the centralized system of governance and led to the birth of the interlacustrine kingdoms that occupy the area between L. Kyoga and L. Tanganyika.
Ekitaguriro is traditional fascinating dance of Banyankole characterized by energetic stamping and tangling rhythms using the feet and aerial arm movements that depicts their relationship with their beautiful long horned cattle.

Banyankole would get married to ladies selected by their parents when it came to marriage. This involved different discussions by the parents of the couple to be about the future relationship of their children and the bride price. Later the agreed pride price would be paid to the girl’s parents in form of cows. Parents and relatives of the couple would bless their children by giving gifts on the wedding day. The girl’s auntie would accompany her to the groom’s house and stay for some days to eyewitness and authenticate whether the groom was potent.

A family could resist a young sister from getting married before her elder sister to the extent that they would even interchange a young sisters’ husband at the wedding day and would give away the elder sister in her place. In case the man realized, he would be asked to pay extra bride wealth if he wanted to add on that lady as a second wife. In traditional culture of Banyankole, weak ladies were not allowed in marriage though efforts could be made to make sure that she gains weight through resting her from any kind of work at home, subjected to heavy drinking of Amakamo (local yoghurt) and hiding her from the public, an act known as ‘Okuhumuza’ meaning resting to help the lady to grow fat and look very healthy ready for marriage.

Eshabwe a traditional Banyankole dish consisting of ghee skimmed from milk makes the biggest percentage of the diet of a Munyankole though other food crops like bananas are usually prepared on open wood fire. The main staples of the diet are various types of cereals (Maize and millet are the main cereals consumed) and starchy roots consisting of cassava and sweet potatoes.
Basoga and Bamasaba the natives of Mt. Elgon area dominates the eastern region. Commonly known for culture of Imbalu, the Bamasaba are admired for their initiation custom where boys are circumcised as a way of initiating them into manhood. These cerebrations are made colorful by the Imbalu dance as the main celebrants and other youth engage in a dance where the ladies shake their waists and bums in a rather spirited way as they run around in jubilation to solicit courage and morale for the boys that are about to face the pain of the knife.

Kyabazinga is the head of Basoga organized in a centralized society. The Basoga practice Tamenhaibunga dance which expresses and remind people of the importance of love and friendship for one another. Nalufuka-a much faster and youthful version of Tamenhaibuga, Eirongo-a slower dance performance to celebrate the birth of twins, Amayebe-dance which builds physical stamina especially for men, Enswezi-used to communicate to super naturals and Ekigwo for wrestlers are some of the other traditional dances practiced in Busoga.

Emboli and Amayido is the traditional dish of the Basoga while Malewa is a delicacy to Bamasaba made from tender bamboo shoots that are first boiled and later on sundried before cooking. Other common traditional dishes in the eastern region include Atapa, cassava and cow peas consumed especially among the Iteso. Other tribes in the eastern region include the Basamia, Bagwere, Iteso, Japadhola, and the Sebei among others.

Langi, Acholi in the north and Lugbara, Madi, and Alur in west Nile are some of traditional tribes that dominate the northern region. Two ancient brothers known as Labongo and Jipiiri are thought to be the origin of different tribes of the Sudanic origin. Agriculture is the most important economic activity and many people from Lango and Acholi sub regions depend on it for survival with millet and sorghum serving as staple foods. Karo a mixture of millet, sorghum and cassava floor to form bread is primarily their traditional dish and Malakwang-a sour vegetable often prepared with ground nuts paste and sometimes served with sweet potatoes.

Recognized for not only their strong value for their pastoral culture but also their Naleyo dance, the Karamajong in the north eastern side of the country have stood for their culture against the odds of modernity.  Women line up and men strike their breasts using fingers as they dance which is not only fascinating but also a great symbol of a unique culture. Permission to marry and material goods required for bride wealth depends upon young man’s lineage head and elders. Negotiations and talks surrounding the marriage were much involved in by the Elders of the bride’s lineage. Their sister tribe Ik is amazing in their way of life. Their bride wealth valued by the number of bee hives one is able to pay to the bride’s family, is yet another wonder in this spectacular culture.

A visit to Uganda is purely cultural packed; enjoy the great diversity of the Uganda’s culture and ethnicity that is largely credited to the diverse origin of its people. Find out why Uganda is said to be cultural melting pot and a summary of the African continent starting from the original hunter gatherer societies of the Bambuti and Batwa pygmies to the Nilotics from Sudan and North Africa, the Bantu speaking people from the Cameroon highlands in West Africa and then the Nilo- Hamites and Hamites from the north eastern part of Africa. Discover their cultural dances, artifacts, attractions, breathtaking cultural stories and most importantly their way of life.

 

Uganda’s is well blessed with people originating from the five main distinctive groups, four of which were immigrants while one was an original inhabitant of the land. The country’s most ancient inhabitants confined to the hilly southwest are the Batwa and Bambuti Pygmies, remnants of the hunter-gatherer cultures that once occupied much of East Africa.

 

Considered as “Summarized Africa”, Uganda is a hub for the African cultures because almost every African society is well represented. Describing this country’s culture is not an easy task as the diversity of its people is over whelming. Let us know where to begin from and I may try to lead you to its end. Positioned at the geographical heart of the African continent, Uganda has long been a cultural melting pot, as evidenced by the existence of over 66 different indigenous cultures and dialects belonging to five distinct linguistic groups with an equally diverse cultural medley of music, art and handicrafts.

 

Bantu speaking people are among the four major immigrant groups and they include Bakonjo, Basamia, Banyoro, Baganda, Bamasaba, Basoga, Bagwere, Batooro, Banyankole, Bakiga, to mention but a few. They are said to have originated from Cameroon highlands and Congo forests. They include these tribes settled in the southern part of the country separated from the Nilotic tribes of the North by the swampy L. Kyoga. These were mainly cultivators and reared few animals.

 

Originated around the Ethiopian highlands, some Hamites and Nilo-Hamites settled in the south western Uganda, Rwanda, others in the northeast and eastern parts of Uganda. The Hamites tribe was made of the Hutu and Tutsi in Rwanda and Hima who are currently living in Ankole and have been absorbed into Banyankole. The Nilo-Hamites include the Iteso, Karimajong and Kumam in the eastern and north eastern part of the country. They were largely pastoralists, herding several numbers of animals with which they would move from one place to another looking for pasture and water.

 

Composed of the Lugbara, Madi, Acholi, Langi, Kakwa and Alur among others, the Nilotic group are said to have come from Sudan and later settled in the west Nile and other northern parts of Uganda.

 

Happenings and incidents are celebrated by almost all Uganda’s cultures and sub tribes in the same though in different ways. For example most societies considered the birth of twins as a blessing and leading to community jubilation. The birth of a prince, victory in war, inauguration of a king and in some societies, the initiation of a member from one stage to another as well as performing of rituals are some other occasions that would attract great celebrations in Ugandan societies.

 

Baganda dominates the central part of the country and they are famous for their different ceremonial occasions prepared for fulfillment of cultural rituals and norms, commemoration, remembrance, observance and inauguration. Some of the common ceremonies in Buganda include; the initiation of twins (okwalula abalongo), the introduction (okwanjula) and last funeral rite (okwabya olumbe). Other ceremonies like cerebration of the king’s birth day are also significant in the life of a Muganda.

 

Traditional Cultural dances are paramount in bringing a spirit of togetherness, entertaining the king and a symbol of identity to the Baganda culture that include Bakisimba, Amagunju, Muwogola and Nankasa. Sight several key cultural sites in Buganda including a UNESCO world heritage site-Kasubi tombs where bodies of the former kings were laid to rest, Wamala tombs another burial site for some kings and Nakayima tree eminent residence for the goddess Nakayima believed to be a source of blessings. The Baganda dance involve a flawless `circular’ movement of the waist and a tip toeing movement of the feet plus hands spread out from the shoulder joint but bent forward or up wards at the elbow joint depending on the type of dance. The dance moves or patterns are dictated by the lyrics or song meaning but mostly by the cadence of the song.

 

Western side of Uganda is dominated by the Banyankole who are well recognized for their wealthy culture connected with their strong link and love for their long horned cows which are thought to have originated from the former rulers of Bunyoro Kitara Empire called the Bachwezi-a demi god people who introduced the centralized system of governance and led to the birth of the interlacustrine kingdoms that occupy the area between L. Kyoga and L. Tanganyika.

Ekitaguriro is traditional fascinating dance of Banyankole characterized by energetic stamping and tangling rhythms using the feet and aerial arm movements that depicts their relationship with their beautiful long horned cattle.

 

Banyankole would get married to ladies selected by their parents when it came to marriage. This involved different discussions by the parents of the couple to be about the future relationship of their children and the bride price. Later the agreed pride price would be paid to the girl’s parents in form of cows. Parents and relatives of the couple would bless their children by giving gifts on the wedding day. The girl’s auntie would accompany her to the groom’s house and stay for some days to eyewitness and authenticate whether the groom was potent.

 

A family could resist a young sister from getting married before her elder sister to the extent that they would even interchange a young sisters’ husband at the wedding day and would give away the elder sister in her place. In case the man realized, he would be asked to pay extra bride wealth if he wanted to add on that lady as a second wife. In traditional culture of Banyankole, weak ladies were not allowed in marriage though efforts could be made to make sure that she gains weight through resting her from any kind of work at home, subjected to heavy drinking of Amakamo (local yoghurt) and hiding her from the public, an act known as ‘Okuhumuza’ meaning resting to help the lady to grow fat and look very healthy ready for marriage.

 

Eshabwe a traditional Banyankole dish consisting of ghee skimmed from milk makes the biggest percentage of the diet of a Munyankole though other food crops like bananas are usually prepared on open wood fire. The main staples of the diet are various types of cereals (Maize and millet are the main cereals consumed) and starchy roots consisting of cassava and sweet potatoes.

Basoga and Bamasaba the natives of Mt. Elgon area dominates the eastern region. Commonly known for culture of Imbalu, the Bamasaba are admired for their initiation custom where boys are circumcised as a way of initiating them into manhood. These cerebrations are made colorful by the Imbalu dance as the main celebrants and other youth engage in a dance where the ladies shake their waists and bums in a rather spirited way as they run around in jubilation to solicit courage and morale for the boys that are about to face the pain of the knife.

 

Kyabazinga is the head of Basoga organized in a centralized society. The Basoga practice Tamenhaibunga dance which expresses and remind people of the importance of love and friendship for one another. Nalufuka-a much faster and youthful version of Tamenhaibuga, Eirongo-a slower dance performance to celebrate the birth of twins, Amayebe-dance which builds physical stamina especially for men, Enswezi-used to communicate to super naturals and Ekigwo for wrestlers are some of the other traditional dances practiced in Busoga.

 

Emboli and Amayido is the traditional dish of the Basoga while Malewa is a delicacy to Bamasaba made from tender bamboo shoots that are first boiled and later on sundried before cooking. Other common traditional dishes in the eastern region include Atapa, cassava and cow peas consumed especially among the Iteso. Other tribes in the eastern region include the Basamia, Bagwere, Iteso, Japadhola, and the Sebei among others.

 

Langi, Acholi in the north and Lugbara, Madi, and Alur in west Nile are some of traditional tribes that dominate the northern region. Two ancient brothers known as Labongo and Jipiiri are thought to be the origin of different tribes of the Sudanic origin. Agriculture is the most important economic activity and many people from Lango and Acholi sub regions depend on it for survival with millet and sorghum serving as staple foods. Karo a mixture of millet, sorghum and cassava floor to form bread is primarily their traditional dish and Malakwang-a sour vegetable often prepared with ground nuts paste and sometimes served with sweet potatoes.

 

Recognized for not only their strong value for their pastoral culture but also their Naleyo dance, the Karamajong in the north eastern side of the country have stood for their culture against the odds of modernity.  Women line up and men strike their breasts using fingers as they dance which is not only fascinating but also a great symbol of a unique culture. Permission to marry and material goods required for bride wealth depends upon young man’s lineage head and elders. Negotiations and talks surrounding the marriage were much involved in by the Elders of the bride’s lineage. Their sister tribe Ik is amazing in their way of life. Their bride wealth valued by the number of bee hives one is able to pay to the bride’s family, is yet another wonder in this spectacular culture.

 

A visit to Uganda is purely cultural packed; enjoy the great diversity of the Uganda’s culture and ethnicity that is largely credited to the diverse origin of its people. Find out why Uganda is said to be cultural melting pot and a summary of the African continent starting from the original hunter gatherer societies of the Bambuti and Batwa pygmies to the Nilotics from Sudan and North Africa, the Bantu speaking people from the Cameroon highlands in West Africa and then the Nilo- Hamites and Hamites from the north eastern part of Africa. Discover their cultural dances, artifacts, attractions, breathtaking cultural stories and most importantly their way of life.

Uganda’s accommodation industry growth was mainly tailored to the tourist industry and the greatest expansion of the industry cropped up at the peak of the industry in the mid and late 1960s. Presently, according to East African Standards for grading and classification of hospitality facilities, 4% of the total facilities are already qualified for grading.  Given sensitization which is a requirement before grading, 62% of the facilities would be able to fulfill the requirements thereby qualify for grading.   

Following years of slow recovery the hospitality sector witnessed a strong appetite for growth in 1990’s, a trend that set to pick up pace in 2014. Thanks to the improving economic backdrop. However, despite improvements, the challenges of an increasingly competitive environment remain: investment and optimization of capital, operational vigor and changing guest demographics will remain top of mind for industry players.

After improved performance for Uganda’s hotel industry in recent years, stronger renewed demand and average daily rates up in recent years to a good start. Uganda’s hotels are benefiting from a resilient economy and buoyant travel markets. We are seeing real evidence of a sustained and bedded-in growth story in towns, as well as continued growth in Kampala city.

Most of the accommodation facilities for tourists’ standard are concentrated in and around Kampala. Properties offering both accommodation and meeting facilities range from big to small, with a broad variety of meeting and conference facilities from stately boardrooms to high-tech amphitheatres and everything in between. Whatever your size, purpose and budget, we’re sure we can find the perfect fit for you and your business here in Uganda. Many smaller but modern tourist accommodation facilities have also been set up, to cope with the growing demand for cheaper but decent accommodation.

Uganda now has private and fully equipped meeting facilities and boardrooms that offer high class stylish business environments which cater for all business needs. Meet your partners or hold your business gatherings in the comfort of Uganda’s corporate business Hotels. All meeting room facilities are located in prime towns’ locations such as Kampala, Entebbe and Jinja.  Hotels feature beautiful venues in smaller cities around Uganda that will perfectly cater to your business meeting needs. Hotel teams will gladly assist in providing you with the technical equipment you need for the meeting room facility of your choice.

Kampala has a stylish collection of individually designed hotels offering first-class meetings and event facilities across the city. Modern function spaces are flexible for conferences, exhibitions and private event use, and are equipped with Wi-Fi integration and most importantly, natural daylight or high specification intelligent lighting in all suites. The Sheraton Kampala, Kampala Serena Hotel, Speke Resort Munyonyo, Imperial Resort Beach Entebbe, Imperial Royale, Grand Imperial, Equatorial and Africana Hotel are some of the key Tourist accommodation facilities in Uganda, offering Four to Five star hotel and conference services.

 In Uganda, event facilities are perfectly complemented by stylish guest rooms, flawlessly delivered serviced and award-winning restaurant and bars.  Business travel hotels offer full-service business centers and access to executive lounges with exclusive services. With a range of outstanding facilities and a dedicated team of professionals to hand, you'll be pleased with Uganda’s hotels.

With outstanding assistance and determined customer service meetings and events team in each of hotels in Uganda we will make sure that your business gathering will be one to remember. Whether you are interested in a venue for short meetings or even day long conferences - don't hesitate to enquire about corporate meeting rooms today and the hotel will make sure it exceeds your expectations. Hotels have great deals available for conferences and meetings along with discounts for hotel rooms. Discover meeting pledge Hotels offer in luxury accommodation together with the finest conference and business meeting facilities.

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